Enigma ¦ MCMXC a.D.

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1990

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MCMXC a.D.
A painting of a red Latin cross that has fallen over off of a cloud with a shining red cross-like image in its place on a blue sky background. The image is outlined by a thick black border that has the artist and album names written in gold.
Studio album by
Released3 December 1990
Recorded1990
StudioA.R.T. (Ibiza, Spain)
Genre
Length40:16
Label
ProducerMichael Cretu
Enigma chronology
MCMXC a.D.
(1990)
The Cross of Changes
(1993)
Singles from MCMXC a.D.
  1. "Sadeness (Part I)"
    Released: 1 October 1990
  2. "Mea Culpa (Part II)"
    Released: 17 April 1991
  3. "Principles of Lust"
    Released: 1991
  4. "The Rivers of Belief"
    Released: 1991

MCMXC a.D. is the debut studio album by the German musical project Enigma, led by Romanian-German musician Michael Cretu. It was released in Europe by Virgin Records on 3 December 1990, and in the United States by Charisma Records on 12 February 1991. Cretu became fascinated with mixing archaic sounds with modern music after producing German pop singer Sandra's song "Everlasting Love", for which he experimented with Gregorian chant. Following Michael Cretu and Sandra's marriage in 1988, Michael developed the idea of the musical project Enigma and recorded the album over the course of eight months in 1990 at A.R.T. Studios.

MCMXC a.D. combines new-age music with dance rhythms, as well as combining themes of religion and Gregorian chant with sexuality, for which the album received generally positive reviews from music critics. The Gregorian chant was taken from recordings by Capella Antiqua München, which resulted in the Munich-based choir's label, Polydor Germany suing Cretu and Virgin Records for infringing on its "right of personality".[1] The case was dropped after Cretu agreed to pay compensation.

Commercially, MCMXC a.D. became a worldwide success, reaching the top 10 on record charts in 10 countries, including charting at number six in the United States, staying on the country's Billboard 200 chart for 282 weeks. It was certified quadruple platinum in the US by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). Four singles from the album were released: "Sadeness (Part I)", "Mea Culpa (Part II)", "Principles of Lust", and "The Rivers of Belief". The lead single topped charts worldwide.

Background and release

In 1987, Michael Cretu worked with Sandra on her song "Everlasting Love". Cretu experimented with Gregorian chant while working on the song with Sandra, and the chants appeared at the beginning of her song.[2] He would become fascinated with incorporating archaic sounds into contemporary songs.[2] Michael Cretu married Sandra in 1988 and came up with the idea of a new-age musical project, which would become known as "Enigma".[2][3] MCMXC a.D. was recorded in 1990 in eight months at A.R.T. Studios, Cretu's studio located on the Spanish island of Ibiza.[4] Cretu conceived the album as one continuous song;[5] his philosophy when creating it was, "Contrary to the usual record-company philosophy, people are open-minded and starved for something unique."[6] Cretu produced MCMXC a.D., with creative input from Frank Peterson and .[2][7]

The first song recorded for the album was "Sadeness (Part I)". After making the song, Michael told Sandra Cretu, "This will be a huge hit or nothing at all."[8] "Sadeness (Part I)" was released as a single on 1 October 1990.[9] Michael Cretu wanted to be anonymous and wished for the single not to be promoted. He believed that it was not important for consumers to know who the producer is and wanted them to buy the single for the music itself. Due to this, he was credited as Curly M.C.,[a][11] while Peterson was credited as F. Gregorian,[b] and Cuitad was credited as David Fairstein.[7][13] Virgin Records promoted the song with radio and club-play only.[9] Despite having virtually no promotion, "Sadeness (Part I)" became an international hit and reached number one the fastest of any German song.[8][6][9]

MCMXC a.D. was released in Europe by Virgin Records on 3 December 1990, and in the United States by Charisma Records on 12 February 1991.[5] Cretu still wanted to remain anonymous, believing that the consumers would buy the album for the music itself.[8] The three producers were credited on MCMXC a.D. under the same monikers as on "Sadeness (Part I)": Cretu as Curly M.C., Peterson as F. Gregorian, and Cuitad as David Fairstein.[14]

Composition and lyrics

Overview

MCMXC a.D. is 40 minutes and 16 seconds long and is divided into seven tracks, two of which contain three separate songs each. The track "The Principles of Lust" contains "Sadeness", "Find Love", and "Sadeness (Reprise)"; and "Back to the Rivers of Belief" contains "Way to Eternity", "Hallelujah", and "The Rivers of Belief".[14] The album encompasses a range of genres, including new-age, worldbeat, and pop music;[5][15][16][17] and it utilizes hip-hop and dance rhythms.[5][17][18] The album is well known for its mixing of Gregorian chant and other religious overtones with sexuality;[19] the lead single, "Sadeness (Part I)", being the prime example.[8][12][20] It is a common misconception that, because "Sadeness (Part I)" employs Gregorian chants, the entire album contains such chants. In debunking this notion, Cretu stated that "'Sadeness' is only one piece of the puzzle."[6] Larry Flick from Billboard further clarified, saying that "Mea Culpa" maintains the atmosphere of "Sadeness", but "without the aid of Gregorian chants."[6] According to the Journal of Religion and Health, MCMXC a.D. follows the narrative of facing one's demons and making peace with them.[18]

Songs

"The Voice of Enigma" was written solely by Cretu,[14] and starts with a foghorn sound that is known as the "Enigma horn".[21] After the foghorn, Sandra Cretu[19] starts talking and invites the listener to relax and take a deep breath,[17] while an environmental soundscape plays in the background.[16] "The Principles of Lust" track employs a drumbeat throughout similar to the R&B 1989 song "Back to Life (However Do You Want Me)" by Soul II Soul, flute synth lines, and Cretu's whispers and "orgasmic breathing" that mark the song breaks.[5][12][22] The first part, "Sadeness",[14] includes a Gregorian chant taken from the track "Procedamus in pace!" from the 1976 album Paschale Mysterium by Capella Antiqua München.[23][15] It also includes contributions from Fabrice Cuitad and Peterson.[13] The song's French lyrics are a quizzical look at, and defense of, the 18th-century writer Marquis de Sade, who was notorious for writing literature delving into themes of sexual violence and domination.[11][12]

"Callas Went Away" was written solely by Michael Cretu,[14] and samples Maria Callas's singing.[17] "Mea Culpa" was written by Cretu and Fabrice Cuitad[14] and is a follow-up to "Sadeness".[12] Like "Sadeness", "Mea Culpa" samples Gregorian chant from the Capella Antiqua München[1] and thus evokes the same atmosphere.[6] The song's theme "centers around guilt", according to the official Enigma website.[24] "The Voice & the Snake", written by Cretu and Peterson,[14] is based on the Book of Revelation.[25] "Knocking on Forbidden Doors" was written solely by Cretu.[14] The "Back to the Rivers of Belief" track's three songs were mainly written by Cretu, with the song "The Rivers of Belief"—which centers around the Indian river Ganges and differs from the other songs in being more soulful—including contributions from Fabrice Cuitad.[14][24][26]

Singles

Four songs from MCMXC a.D. were released as singles. "Sadeness (Part I)", known as "Sadeness" in the album and the first part of the "The Principles of Lust" track,[14] was released as the lead single on 1 October 1990.[9][22] The single has sold at least 7 million copies worldwide,[27] and was the fastest German single to reach number one,[6][8] the week of 12 November 1990.[28] The Los Angeles Times reported that the single reached number one in at least 14 other countries.[11] "Mea Culpa (Part II)", known as "Mea Culpa" in the album,[14] was released as the second single on 17 April 1991,[29] and reached number seven on both the German charts and on the Billboard Dance Club Songs chart.[30][31] The song charted at number four in France,[32] and received a gold certification from the French National Syndicate of Phonographic Publishing (SNEP).[33] Cretu considers "Mea Culpa (Part II)" his favorite song from the album.[34] "Principles of Lust" and "The Rivers of Belief" were both as singles released in 1991.[29] The "Principles of Lust" single is the song "Find Love" renamed.[14] The single charted at number 90 in Germany,[35] number 59 in the UK,[36] and number 29 in France.[37] "The Rivers of Belief" single is the third song of the "Back to the Rivers of Belief" album track.[14] The single charted in the United Kingdom at number 68,[38] and in Sweden at number 37.[39]

Critical reception

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic4/5 stars[17]
A[19]
Entertainment WeeklyA−[16]
The Village VoiceC–[40]

MCMXC a.D. was met with generally positive reviews from music critics. Danny Serbib of Colorado Springs Magazine said that by adding Gregorian chant to the album, "[Cretu had] redefined the possible future of popular music."[19] Mikko Stübner-Lankuttis from Deutsche Welle put MCMXC a.D. at number one on his "The Top 10 albums from Germany", saying "His combination of new-age sounds with dance beats regularly took the project to the top of the international charts."[41]

AllMusic critic Ned Raggett said, "Michael Crétu's attempt at fusing everything from easy listening sex music and hip-hop rhythms to centuries-old Gregorian chants could not have been more designed to tweak the nose of high art."[17] Marisa Fox wrote, for Entertainment Weekly, that while the album doesn't have as many accessible hits as other ones, "[the] journey through what the group calls 'music, spirit, and meditation' is entrancing as well as provocative."[16]

In contrast, Brian Bourke, in the Syracuse Herald-Journal, stated that "once the novelty of Enigma's approach wears off", the rhythms underneath the songs have a sameness that is "irritating" in his eyes, with the exception of "The Rivers of Belief".[26] The Village Voice critic Robert Christgau asserted that the "mellow electrobeat and Gregorian fog" of "Sadeness (Part I)" "provide[s] mutual relief", and suggested the other songs are disco filler with sexual content that is too lacking in vulgarity for his tastes.[40]

Commercial performance

MCMXC a.D. was a worldwide commercial success. According to The New York Times, the album had sold 12 million copies worldwide as of February 1994.[20] In Germany, MCMXC a.D. entered the German Albums chart at number 60 for the week of 10 December 1990.[28] It peaked at number three for the week of 24 December 1990 and left after appearing at number 72 for the week of 8 July 1991.[28] The album re-entered the chart at number 68 for the week of 21 February 1994 and left after appearing at number 69 for the week of 21 March 1991. MCMXC a.D. re-entered the German Albums chart at number 80 for the week of 9 December 1996 and left after appearing at number 73 for the week of 13 January 1997.[28] The album spent 46 weeks on the German chart,[28] and has been certified double platinum by the Bundesverband Musikindustrie (BVMI), indicating shipments in excess of one million copies in Germany.[42]

In the US, MCMXC a.D. entered the Billboard 200 at number 169 for the week of 2 March 1991.[43] It stayed on the Billboard 200 for 262 weeks,[c] peaking at number six for the week of 3 May 1991.[45] On the US Top Catalog Albums chart, MCMXC a.D. peaked at number four for the week of 10 May 1997.[46] The album has since been certified quadruple platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), denoting shipments in excess of four million copies in the US.[47]

MCMXC a.D. topped the UK Albums Chart for the week of 20 January 1991,[48] spending 60 weeks on the chart.[49] The album has since been certified triple platinum by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) for shipments in excess of 900,000 copies in the UK.[50] Elsewhere, MCMXC a.D. reached number one in Belgium, Greece, Portugal, and Spain;[51][52] number two in Australia,[53] New Zealand,[54] and Switzerland;[55] number three in Austria,[56] Canada,[57] and Sweden;[58] number four in Ireland and Norway;[59][60] and number seven in the Netherlands.[61]

Controversies

Satanism rumors

Because MCMXC a.D. has themes of balancing good with evil, Cretu has been accused of putting satanic content into the album.[11][12] Many of the accusations were concerned with the Gregorian being satanic. This resulted in many Catholic-backed radio stations in Europe banning "Sadeness (Part I)" from being played.[10] While most of the press did not think that MCMXC a.D had satanic implications, Charisma Records issued a press release denying such claims.[11] Cretu stated that he did not mean for there to be any implications of satanism with the album, revealing he wanted the combination of Gregorian chant and lyrics relating to the Marquis de Sade to be seen as a paradox.[10][11]

Lawsuit

In an 1990 interview with Verdens Gang, Cretu claimed that the Gregorian chants used on MCMXC a.D. were recorded in Romania and said that the singers were given their share of the "D-marks" Cretu got from "Sadeness" and the album.[23][62] This proved to be false; in 1991 Capella Antiqua München, a Munich-based choir, recognized a sample of one of their recordings on MCMXC a.D. Their label, Polydor Germany, sued Cretu and Virgin Records for infringing on its "right of personality" in using the Gregorian chant samples in "Sadeness (Part I)" and "Mea Culpa". The lawsuit was settled out of court after Virgin publicly apologized for the infringement and Cretu agreed to pay compensation to the original creator of the samples.[d][1][23]

Track listing

1990 original version[14]
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."The Voice of Enigma"Curly M.C.2:21
2."Principles of Lust"
  • a. "Sadeness"
  • b. "Find Love"
  • c. "Sadeness (Reprise)"
Curly M.C., David Fairstein ("Sadeness", "Sadeness (Reprise)"), F. Gregorian ("Sadeness", "Sadeness (Reprise)")11:43
3."Callas Went Away"Curly M.C.4:27
4."Mea Culpa"Curly M.C., Fairstein5:03
5."The Voice & the Snake"Curly M.C., F. Gregorian1:39
6."Knocking on Forbidden Doors"Curly M.C.4:31
7."Back to the Rivers of Belief"
  • a. "Way to Eternity"
  • b. "Hallelujah"
  • c. "The Rivers of Belief"
  • Curly M.C., Fairstein ("The Rivers of Belief")10:32
    Total length:40:16
    1991 "The Limited Edition"[63]
    No.TitleWriter(s)Length
    8."Sadeness (Meditation)"Curly M.C., Gregorian, Fairstein2:43
    9."Mea Culpa (Fading Shades)"Curly M.C., Fairstein6:04
    10."Principles of Lust (Everlasting Lust)"Curly M.C.4:50
    11."The Rivers of Belief (The Returning Silence)"Curly M.C., Fairstein7:04
    Total length:20:41

    Personnel

    Credits adapted from the liner notes of MCMXC a.D.[14]

    Charts

    Certifications

    Certifications and sales for MCMXC a.D.
    RegionCertificationCertified units/sales
    Argentina (CAPIF)[80]Gold30,000^
    Australia (ARIA)[81]3× Platinum210,000^
    Austria (IFPI Austria)[82]Gold25,000*
    Brazil (Pro-Música Brasil)[83]Gold100,000*
    Canada (Music Canada)[84]2× Platinum200,000^
    France (SNEP)[85]2× Platinum600,000*
    Germany (BVMI)[42]2× Platinum1,000,000^
    Netherlands (NVPI)[86]Platinum100,000^
    New Zealand (RMNZ)[87]Gold7,500^
    Spain (PROMUSICAE)[88]Platinum100,000^
    Sweden (GLF)[89]Gold50,000^
    Switzerland (IFPI Switzerland)[90]2× Platinum100,000^
    United Kingdom (BPI)[50]3× Platinum900,000^
    United States (RIAA)[47]4× Platinum4,000,000^

    * Sales figures based on certification alone.
    ^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.

    Notes

    1. ^ "Curly" is the English meaning of the Romanian Cretu, and M.C. are his initials.[10]
    2. ^ F. Gregorian is short for Father Gregorian.[10][12]
    3. ^ The ninth longest time an album has ever been on the Billboard 200.[44]
    4. ^ The case did not cover copyright infringement, as the Kapelle Antiqua recordings were in the public domain.[1]
    5. ^ a b The MCMXC a.D. liner notes do not state what his role in the album was, but the "Sadeness (Part I)" liner notes give his role as "Music".[13]
    6. ^ The MCMXC a.D. liner notes do not state what his role in the album was, but the "Sadeness (Part I)" liner notes give his role as "Text".[13]

    References

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    71. ^ "RPM 100 Albums (CDs & Cassettes) of 1991". RPM. Vol. 55 no. 3. 21 December 1991. ISSN 0315-5994. Archived from the original on 31 December 2020 – via Library and Archives Canada.
    72. ^ "Jaaroverzichten – Album 2004" (in Dutch). Dutch Charts. Archived from the original on 31 December 2020. Retrieved 22 November 2020.
    73. ^ "European Top 100 Albums – 1991" (PDF). Music & Media. Vol. 8 no. 51/52. 21 December 1991. p. 24. OCLC 29800226. Archived (PDF) from the original on 31 December 2020 – via World Radio History.
    74. ^ "Top 100 Album-Jahrescharts – 1991" (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Archived from the original on 9 May 2015. Retrieved 22 November 2020.
    75. ^ "Top Selling Albums of 1991". Recorded Music NZ. Archived from the original on 31 December 2020. Retrieved 22 November 2020.
    76. ^ "Swiss Year-End Charts 1991". swisscharts.com. Archived from the original on 31 December 2020. Retrieved 22 November 2020.
    77. ^ "1991 Top 100 Albums". Music Week. London. 11 January 1992. p. 21. ISSN 0265-1548. OCLC 1120343590.
    78. ^ "Billboard 200 Albums – Year-End 1991". Billboard. Archived from the original on 31 December 2020. Retrieved 22 November 2020.
    79. ^ "Top Billboard 200 Albums – Year-End 1994". Billboard. Archived from the original on 6 May 2018. Retrieved 23 December 2020.
    80. ^ "Argentinian album certifications – Enigma – MCMXC AD". Argentine Chamber of Phonograms and Videograms Producers. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011.
    81. ^ Ryan, Gavin (2011). Australia's Music Charts 1988–2010. Mt. Martha, VIC, Australia: Moonlight Publishing.
    82. ^ "Austrian album certifications – Enigma – MCMXC a.D." (in German). IFPI Austria.
    83. ^ "Brazilian album certifications – Enigma – MCMXC a.D." (in Portuguese). Pro-Música Brasil.
    84. ^ "Canadian album certifications – Enigma – MCMXC a.D." Music Canada.
    85. ^ "French album certifications – Enigma – MCMXC a.D." (in French). InfoDisc. Select ENIGMA and click OK. 
    86. ^ "Dutch album certifications – Enigma – MCMXC a.D." (in Dutch). Nederlandse Vereniging van Producenten en Importeurs van beeld- en geluidsdragers. Enter MCMXC a.D. in the "Artiest of titel" box.
    87. ^ "New Zealand album certifications – Enigma – MCMXC a.D." Recorded Music NZ.
    88. ^ Salaverri, Fernando (September 2005). Sólo éxitos: año a año, 1959–2002 (PDF) (in Spanish) (1st ed.). Madrid: Fundación Autor/SGAE. p. 930. ISBN 84-8048-639-2. Archived (PDF) from the original on 21 December 2016. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
    89. ^ "Guld- och Platinacertifikat − År 1987−1998" (PDF) (in Swedish). IFPI Sweden. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 May 2011.
    90. ^ "The Official Swiss Charts and Music Community: Awards (Enigma; 'MCMXC a. D.')". IFPI Switzerland. Hung Medien.

    External links

    Artist(s)

    Veröffentlichungen von Enigma die im OTRS erhältlich sind/waren:

    MCMXC a.D. ¦ The Cross Of Changes ¦ Le Roi Est Mort, Vive Le Roi!

    Enigma auf Wikipedia (oder andere Quellen):

    Enigma ist ein internationales Musikprojekt des deutsch-rumänischen Musikproduzenten und Komponisten Michael Cretu in den Bereichen elektronische Musik und New-Age, bei dem Sandra teilweise den Sprechgesang übernimmt. Seit 1999 singt auch Andru Donalds für Enigma.

    Geschichte

    Das erste Album MCMXC a.D. erschien 1990 in Europa und 1991 in den USA und wurde schon nach kurzer Zeit zum weltweiten Überraschungserfolg. MCMXC a.D. wurde die Nummer 1 in 41 Ländern und erhielt 57 mal Platin und 45 mal Gold. Die Debüt-Single Sadeness Part I schaffte es nicht nur in Deutschland auf Platz eins, sondern auch in vielen anderen Ländern wie Frankreich und Großbritannien. In den USA kam die Single bis auf Platz 5.

    Mit der Veröffentlichung der ersten Single war völlig unbekannt, wer hinter dem Projekt steckt, da die Protagonisten noch unter Pseudonymen veröffentlichten. Nach einigen Tagen kamen erste Vermutungen auf, wonach es sich um die Stimme der Sängerin Sandra handeln solle. Erst nach Wochen war die Vermutung laut geworden, dass es sich um ein Projekt von Michael Cretu handeln könnte. Nach Monaten äußerte sich dieser öffentlich und bestätigte, dass Enigma seiner Schmiede entstamme. Tatsächlich war es ein Gemeinschaftsprojekt von Michael Cretu (Curly MC) und dem Hamburger Musikproduzenten Frank Peterson (F. Gregorian), der damals noch Keyboarder bei Sandra war. Von Frank Peterson kam dann auch die Idee, gregorianische Chöre unter die Musik zu mischen. Frank Peterson stieg aber nach dem ersten Album aus dem Projekt aus, um sich seinem eigenen neuen Projekt Gregorian zu widmen.

    Michael Cretu sagte in einem Interview, er schätze es, dass man nur seine Musik kennt, aber er trotzdem noch unerkannt durch die Straßen laufen könne.

    Bis heute sind die Studioalben mehr oder weniger international erfolgreich.

    Enigma diente als Wegbereiter für viele andere Interpreten, die Michael Cretu auf den Pfad der meditativen, religiös angehauchten Ambient-Musik folgten, die oft als Ethno bezeichnet wird.

    Diskografie

    Studioalben

    JahrTitel
    Musiklabel
    Höchstplatzierung, Gesamtwochen, AuszeichnungChartplatzierungenChartplatzierungen
    (Jahr, Titel, Musiklabel, Plat­zie­rungen, Wo­chen, Aus­zeich­nungen, Anmer­kungen)
    Anmerkungen
    DE DEAT ATCH CHUK UKUS US
    1990MCMXC a.D.
    Virgin Records
    DE3
    Doppelplatin
    ×2
    Doppelplatin

    (46 Wo.)DE
    AT3
    Gold
    Gold

    (13 Wo.)AT
    CH2
    Doppelplatin
    ×2
    Doppelplatin

    (20 Wo.)CH
    UK1
    Dreifachplatin
    ×3
    Dreifachplatin

    (107 Wo.)UK
    US6
    Vierfachplatin
    ×4
    Vierfachplatin

    (282 Wo.)US
    Erstveröffentlichung: 26. November 1990
    Verkäufe: + 14.000.000[1]
    1993The Cross of Changes
    Virgin Records
    DE5
    Platin
    Platin

    (31 Wo.)DE
    AT5
    Gold
    Gold

    (25 Wo.)AT
    CH4
    Platin
    Platin

    (28 Wo.)CH
    UK1
    Doppelplatin
    ×2
    Doppelplatin

    (52 Wo.)UK
    US9
    Doppelplatin
    ×2
    Doppelplatin

    (63 Wo.)US
    Erstveröffentlichung: 5. Dezember 1993
    Verkäufe: + 3.865.000
    1996Le roi est mort, vive le roi!
    Virgin Records
    DE3
    Gold
    Gold

    (17 Wo.)DE
    AT4
    Gold
    Gold

    (14 Wo.)AT
    CH4
    Gold
    Gold

    (13 Wo.)CH
    UK12
    Gold
    Gold

    (13 Wo.)UK
    US25
    Platin
    Platin

    (29 Wo.)US
    Erstveröffentlichung: 20. November 1996
    Verkäufe: + 1.911.236
    2000The Screen Behind the Mirror
    Virgin Records
    DE2
    Gold
    Gold

    (17 Wo.)DE
    AT6
    (10 Wo.)AT
    CH4
    Gold
    Gold

    (16 Wo.)CH
    UK7
    Gold
    Gold

    (6 Wo.)UK
    US33
    Gold
    Gold

    (17 Wo.)US
    Erstveröffentlichung: 14. Januar 2000
    Verkäufe: + 930.000
    2003Voyageur
    Virgin Records
    DE6
    (6 Wo.)DE
    AT19
    (6 Wo.)AT
    CH29
    (6 Wo.)CH
    UK46
    (2 Wo.)UK
    US94
    (5 Wo.)US
    Erstveröffentlichung: 5. September 2003
    Verkäufe: + 10.000
    2006A Posteriori
    Virgin Records
    DE16
    (7 Wo.)DE
    AT17
    (6 Wo.)AT
    CH24
    (7 Wo.)CH
    US95
    (3 Wo.)US
    Erstveröffentlichung: 21. September 2006
    Verkäufe: + 20.000
    2008Seven Lives Many Faces
    Virgin Records
    DE15
    (9 Wo.)DE
    AT30
    (4 Wo.)AT
    CH18
    (8 Wo.)CH
    US92
    (2 Wo.)US
    Erstveröffentlichung: 5. August 2008
    Verkäufe: + 13.000
    2016The Fall of a Rebel Angel
    Island Records
    DE10
    (5 Wo.)DE
    AT24
    (1 Wo.)AT
    CH19
    (3 Wo.)CH
    UK40
    (1 Wo.)UK
    US122
    (1 Wo.)US
    Erstveröffentlichung: 11. November 2016

    Auszeichnungen

    • ECHO Pop
      • 1991: in der Kategorie „Nationaler Künstler/-in oder Gruppe im Ausland“
      • 1992: in der Kategorie „Marketing“
      • 1994: in der Kategorie „Nationaler Künstler/-in oder Gruppe im Ausland“
      • 1997: in der Kategorie „Nationaler Künstler/-in oder Gruppe im Ausland“

    Weblinks

    Einzelnachweise

    1. Enigma -- The Answer. five.no, abgerufen am 24. September 2016.

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