Japanese Breakfast ¦ OST Sable

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Veröffentlichung OST Sable:

2021

Hörbeispiel(e) OST Sable:

OST Sable auf Wikipedia (oder andere Quellen):

Sable is an open world exploration video game developed by Shedworks and published by Raw Fury. It was released on 23 September 2021, for Microsoft Windows, Xbox One, and Xbox Series X/S, and released on PlayStation 5 on 29 November 2022.[1][2][3]

Players control Sable, a young girl who embarks on a coming-of-age rite of passage: a search for an appropriate mask and return to her nomadic clan. Exploring the ruined desert planet of Midden, Sable encounters several characters who help her find her place in the world, as well as giving her several tasks that often involve solving puzzles and platforming through rock formations or ancient ruins.[4]

Gameplay

Sable is an open world exploration video game, in which the player can roam and adventure in a non-linear way. The game has no combat or set storyline, since the narrative is explored through NPC dialogue and environmental cues, such as remnants of an ancient civilization left to interpretation. It emphasizes simple puzzle-solving and discovery, traversing sand dunes and ruins. Platforming mechanics are put into place through a stamina gauge that allows for running and climbing, as well as the ability to glide in mid-air.[4]

Parts of the game are customizable, such as Sable's hoverbike and clothing, including the story driven masks. Both hoverbike parts and clothing items can be acquired either by simply exploring the game's world, or by completing quests given by an array of characters, which often revolve around collecting small materials such as bugs or fruit.[4] While clothing is purely cosmetic, with the exception of a few masks, different hoverbike parts affect how the player traverses the world of Midden, with different parts offering several degrees of manoeuvrability, acceleration and top speed.[5]

Development

Daniel Fineberg and Gregorios Kythreotis began development on Sable in 2017, working in a shed belonging to the latter's parents.[6] The two-person indie development team is known as Shedworks. Writer Meg Jayanth also contributed to the game, while musician American singer-songwriter, Michelle Zauner using the name of her band Japanese Breakfast provided the game's soundtrack.[7]

The game's concept came from the planet Jakku on Star Wars: The Force Awakens.[8] Its art style was inspired by the sci-fi works of Jean Giraud, aka Mœbius. The game was also inspired by Breath of the Wild, of The Legend of Zelda series.[9] Each of the game's environments are hand-crafted.[7]

The game premiered at the E3 2018 PC Gaming Show, where it was nominated for Best Independent Game.[10] Originally scheduled for 2019, the game was twice delayed for a 2021 release.[7] Its release was supported by Raw Fury and Microsoft.[6] The game was showcased at the 2021 Tribeca Film Festival, where it competed for the inaugural Tribeca Games Award.[11]

Reception

Critical reception

Sable received "generally favorable" to "mixed or average" reviews, according to review aggregator Metacritic.

Jonathan Peltz, writing for Wired, praised the game as "[...] gorgeous and endlessly GIF-able".[24] Alice Bell of Rock Paper Shotgun, credited the game for looking "[...] fabulous in the flesh" and managing to meet the aesthetic expectations set by trailers and teased content.[25] However, she faulted the game for a number of small irritations, including clunky driving mechanics and difficult navigation, comparing these to the annoyances caused by grains of sand in reality.[25] Inverse's Tomas Franzese praised the game for its relaxing qualities.[26] The Washington Post liked the game's approach to the post-game, saying that it adopted "one of the most easygoing approaches to an endgame I’ve come across in an open-world game".[27]

PC Gamer's Natalie Clayton enjoyed the various points of interest placed throughout the world, describing it as "enigmatic" and "memorable". GameSpot praised the writing of the title, especially praising how it helped normalize characters, "The writing is a strong point, too, namely because it's relatively understated. These characters are just regular people going about their lives, and this is reflected in their personable dialogue". Game Informer liked the side content of the game, noting how it created "narrative variety" and made use of unexplored parts of the map. The Guardian felt the open-ended nature of Sable's world and narrative helped set it apart from other open world games, saying that, "There are whispered points of interest, but there is no wearying to-do list, and as such your journey and destination are uniquely, wonderfully personal".[28]

Awards and accolades

Sable was nominated for the "Best Debut Indie Game" award at The Game Awards 2021,[29] while also garnering nominations for the Golden Joystick Awards' 2021 categories of "Best Audio" and "Best Indie Game".[30] The Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences nominated Sable for "Outstanding Achievement for an Independent Game" at the 25th Annual D.I.C.E. Awards.[31] Sable was also elected as PC Gamer's Best Narrative of 2021.[32]

Potential adaptation

In October 2021, Raw Fury announced that they had entered in a first-look deal with dj2 Entertainment to develop adaptations of games including Sable, Night Call, and Mosaic for film and television.[33]

Soundtrack

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic[35]
Pitchfork7.5/10[34]

Sable (Original Video Game Soundtrack) is a soundtrack album by American indie rock band Japanese Breakfast for the 2021 video game Sable. It was released digitally by Sony Masterworks and Dead Oceans on 24 September 2021, with CD copies released on 29 October 2021, and vinyl set for release on 1 April 2022.[36][37] The album was preceded by the single "Glider" on 27 August 2021.[38]

Michelle Zauner, the band's lead singer and songwriter, was contacted by Fineberg directly to compose the soundtrack, as he was aware of her enjoyment of video games.[39] Zauner began writing the score with concept art and some written descriptions of places in the game for inspiration and guidance.[39] The game's developers sought someone who had not previously composed a video game soundtrack in the hopes of avoiding stylistic conventions associated with scoring games.[39] Zauner has called the song "Better the Mask", written for the game, her "favorite song [she has] ever written as an artist.".[40]

Composition

The soundtrack of Sable consists mainly of ambient pop songs with "new age-inspired instrumentals that nicely conjure the environmental landscapes and moods of the game play".[35] It combines synthesizers, guitars, and both digital and analogue percussion to craft "textured and deeply enveloping soundscapes".[35] "Glider" and "Better the Mask" are two traditional indie pop tunes, with the later inspired by 1970s singer-songwriter music.[35] The score is mainly location-based with different tracks differentiating the in-game cycle of night and day.[34]

Critical reception

Matt Collar of AllMusic said that the album "evoke[s] the poignant lyricism of a Hayao Miyazaki anime soundtrack" and praised Zauner's "ability to translate wide-eyed filmic emotions into pop magic."[35] Pitchfork writer Zhenzhen Yu called the score "Not so much an album as the nerve system of a narrative" and said that it would be "best experienced alongside the physical act of in-game exploration."[34]

Charts

Chart performance for Sable
Chart (2022)Peak
position
US Top Album Sales (Billboard)[41]81
UK Soundtrack Albums (OCC)[42]7

References

  1. ^ Valentine, Rebekah (June 10, 2021). "Sable: Beautiful Gliding Adventure Finally Launches in September - Summer of Gaming". IGN. Retrieved June 10, 2021.
  2. ^ "Sable coming to PS5 in late 2022". Gematsu. September 15, 2022. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  3. ^ "Sable for PS5, PS4 launches November 29". Gematsu. October 28, 2022. Retrieved October 28, 2022.
  4. ^ a b c Northup, Travis (September 22, 2021). "Sable Review". IGN. Retrieved February 18, 2022.
  5. ^ Sable: Why Your Bike Matters, retrieved February 18, 2022
  6. ^ a b Kent, Emma (May 28, 2019). "Gorgeous sci-fi indie Sable will now release next year". Eurogamer. Retrieved July 25, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c Horti, Samuel (July 18, 2019). "Sable: Everything we know so far". PC Gamer. Retrieved July 25, 2020.
  8. ^ Avard, Alex (November 16, 2018). "'What if Rey never left Jakku?' - How indie darling Sable is inspired by Star Wars: The Force Awakens". GamesRadar. Retrieved July 25, 2020.
  9. ^ Peltz, Jonathan (September 22, 2021). "On 'Sable': "You'll See Other Quests in the Game That Are a Bit Silly"". Wired. Retrieved October 14, 2021.
  10. ^ Fogel, Stefanie (June 28, 2018). "'Anthem,' 'Sekiro' Top Nominees for the Game Critics Awards: Best of E3 2018". Variety. Retrieved February 18, 2022.
  11. ^ Beresford, Trilby (May 6, 2021). "Tribeca Festival Unveils Games Lineup Including Annapurna Interactive's 'Twelve Minutes'". The Hollywood Reporter. MRC. Archived from the original on May 6, 2021. Retrieved May 7, 2021.
  12. ^ "Sable for PC Reviews". Metacritic. Red Ventures. Retrieved November 19, 2021.
  13. ^ "Sable for Xbox One Reviews". Metacritic. Red Ventures. Retrieved October 1, 2021.
  14. ^ "Sable for Xbox Series X Reviews". Metacritic. Red Ventures. Retrieved October 19, 2021.
  15. ^ "Sable for PlayStation 5 Reviews". Metacritic. Red Ventures. Retrieved December 26, 2022.
  16. ^ Khan, Zubi (September 22, 2021). "Sable (PC) Review". Computer Games Magazine. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  17. ^ Grodt, Jill (September 22, 2021). "Sable Review – Captivating Gameplay Behind A Beautiful Mask". Game Informer. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  18. ^ "Sable review: "Downright beautiful in its execution and storytelling" | Aces high". GamesRadar. September 22, 2021. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  19. ^ Northup, Travis (September 22, 2021). "Sable Review". IGN. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  20. ^ Clayton, Natalie (September 22, 2021). "Sable review". PC Gamer. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  21. ^ Harris, Ian (September 22, 2021). "Sable review – equal parts Zelda, Moebius, and itself". PCGamesN. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  22. ^ Erskine, Donovan (September 22, 2021). "Sable review: The journey beyond". Shacknews. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  23. ^ Wise, Josh (September 22, 2021). "Sable review". www.videogamer.com. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  24. ^ Peltz, Jonathan (September 22, 2021). "On 'Sable': "You'll See Other Quests in the Game That Are a Bit Silly"". Wired. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  25. ^ a b Bell, Alice (September 22, 2021). "Sable review: a beautiful adventure beset by troubling bugs". Rock, Paper, Shotgun. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  26. ^ Franzese, Tomas (September 28, 2021). "'Sable' is the most relaxing game since 'Animal Crossing: New Horizons'". Inverse. Retrieved October 14, 2021.
  27. ^ "Review | 'Sable': An art game for people who like adventure games, and vice versa". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  28. ^ "Sable review – go build yourself a future, girl". the Guardian. November 6, 2021. Retrieved December 1, 2021.
  29. ^ Ankers, Adele (November 16, 2021). "The Game Awards Nominations Announced". ign.com. Retrieved December 13, 2021.
  30. ^ Ben Tyrer (October 19, 2021). "Golden Joystick Awards 2021: see the full list of nominees and how to vote today". gamesradar. Retrieved February 18, 2022.
  31. ^ Bankhurst, Adam (February 25, 2022). "DICE Awards 2022 Winners: The Full List". IGN. Retrieved March 15, 2022.
  32. ^ PC Gamer (December 27, 2021). "Best Narrative 2021: Sable". PC Gamer. Retrieved February 18, 2022.
  33. ^ Otterson, Joe (October 11, 2021). "Raw Fury Sets First-Look Deal With dj2 Entertainment for Film, Television Projects (EXCLUSIVE)". Variety. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  34. ^ a b c d Yu, Zhenzhen (September 23, 2021). "Japanese Breakfast: Sable (Original Video Game Soundtrack)". Pitchfork. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  35. ^ a b c d e Collar, Matt. "Sable – Japanese Breakfast". AllMusic. Retrieved December 18, 2021.
  36. ^ "Sable (Original Video Game Soundtrack) CD". Rough Trade US. Retrieved December 18, 2021.
  37. ^ "Sable (Original Video Game Soundtrack) LP". Rough Trade US. Retrieved December 18, 2021.
  38. ^ Minsker, Evan (August 27, 2021). "Japanese Breakfast Details New Sable Soundtrack, Releases "Glider": Listen". Pitchfork.
  39. ^ a b c Gordon, Lewis. "Japanese Breakfast on Writing the 'Sable' Soundtrack". Wired. Retrieved October 14, 2021.
  40. ^ Frank, Allegra (September 26, 2021). "Japanese Breakfast Thinks This Is the Best Song She's Ever Written". Slate Magazine. Retrieved October 14, 2021.
  41. ^ "Japanese Breakfast Chart History (Top Album Sales)". Billboard. Retrieved 19 April 2022.
  42. ^ "Official Soundtrack Albums Chart Top 50". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 13 May 2022.

Further reading

External links

Artist(s)

Veröffentlichungen von Japanese Breakfast die im OTRS erhältlich sind/waren:

Jubilee ¦ OST Sable

Japanese Breakfast auf Wikipedia (oder andere Quellen):

Japanese Breakfast is an American indie pop band headed by musician Michelle Zauner. Zauner started the band as a side project in 2013, when she was leading the Philadelphia-based emo group Little Big League. She has said that she named the band after seeing a GIF of Japanese breakfast[1] and deciding that the term would be considered "exotic" to Americans; she also thought it would make others wonder what a Japanese breakfast consists of.[2]

In 2014, she returned to her hometown of Eugene, Oregon, to care for her ailing mother. She continued to record music and songs, first to cope with stress, then, after her mother died, with grief. The songs eventually became Japanese Breakfast's debut studio album: Psychopomp (2016), released by Yellow K Records. Its critical and commercial success led Japanese Breakfast to sign with the record label Dead Oceans, which released the band's second and third studio albums: Soft Sounds from Another Planet (2017) and Jubilee (2021). Jubilee was nominated for Best Alternative Music Album and Japanese Breakfast for Best New Artist at the 64th Annual Grammy Awards[3] and became the band's first album to chart on the Billboard 200, where it peaked at 56.[4]

History

2013–2016: Early releases and Psychopomp

The first Japanese Breakfast release was June (2013), the result of a month-long project in which Zauner and Rachel Gagliardi recorded one song a day and posted them on the Tumblr blog rachelandmichelledojune.[5]

In 2014, Zauner participated as Japanese Breakfast in a song project with musicians Gabrielle Smith, Florist, Frankie Cosmos, and Small Wonder, who posted songs daily on the Tumblr blog may5to12songs. She released her songs from the project on Bandcamp as two digital albums: Where Is My Great Big Feeling?, released on June 6; and American Sound on June 24. Both were released weeks later as the cassette tape American Sound/Where Is My Great Big Feeling.[6][7]

While in Oregon with her family in 2014, Zauner continued recording as Japanese Breakfast, starting with samples of music as a meditative exercise and "instant gratification".[8] She said she had more to say after Tropical Jinx, the 2014 studio album by her emo group Little Big League.

In 2015, while working at an advertising agency, Zauner recorded her first studio album as Japanese Breakfast: Psychopomp, named for the mythological creature.[9] She said her "dark and heavy-handed" record dealt with her mother's death, although she tried to make the music urgent and "sonically upbeat."[10][11] The album's rollout on Yellow K Records began in January 2016 with the release of the single "In Heaven" via Stereogum.[12][13] A second single, titled "Everybody Wants to Love You" was released on February 18, 2016,[14] and the album itself was released on April 1, 2016. Around this time, Japanese Breakfast signed with Dead Oceans, which on June 23, 2016, announced the signing and said Psychopomp would be re-released internationally. A music video for "Jane Cum" was also released the same day. To promote the album, the band opened for Japanese-American singer-songwriter Mitski alongside American musician Jay Som[15] and released a music video for the song "Everybody Wants to Love You"[16] which was later ranked as the 154th best song of the 2010s decade by Quinn Moreland of Pitchfork.[17]

2017–2018: Soft Sounds from Another Planet

Zauner performing live with her band in 2017

On May 4, 2017, Japanese Breakfast released the single "Machinist"[18] and announced the upcoming release of a second studio album, Soft Sounds from Another Planet, whose lyrics are largely concerned with Zauner's detachment and trauma.[19] The song "Boyish" was released as a single on June 7, 2017.[20] A third single from the album, "Road Head", was released on July 6, 2017.[21] The full album was released on July 14, 2017.[22] To promote the album, the band released a video game, "Japanese BreakQuest",[23] in which the main character, "J-Brekkie", gathers a band to prevent an alien invasion. The game was developed by Zauner and game designer Elaine Fath, and uses songs from the album, rendered as 8-bit MIDI tracks by Peter Bradley.[23] To support the album, Japanese Breakfast toured Oceania, Asia and North America[24] from 2017 to 2019.[25] Along the way, the band opened for English shoegaze band Slowdive, American musician (Sandy) Alex G, and Canadian duo Tegan and Sara.[26]

On October 19, 2017, a music video for "Body is a Blade" was released. It was animated using old family photographs and video of Zauner visiting locations from the photos. She described it as "a really personal mixed media piece, almost like a moving scrapbook".[27] On February 13, 2018, the music video for "Boyish" was released. It depicts a girl going to a high school dance, where Zauner and her band, accompanied by fellow indie musician Leslie Bear, are playing a set.[28] The video also features a cameo appearance by musician Lindsey Jordan and was directed by Zauner, who at the time of its release described it as her "favorite video yet" and has retrospectively considered it to be her "magnum opus".[29][30]

2018–present: Jubilee and Sable

Japanese Breakfast performing live in 2018 at the Sasquatch! Music Festival

In 2018, indie game developer Shedworks sent Zauner preliminary images from their video game Sable and commissioned her to write its soundtrack.[31] Unlike the pop songs she writes for Japanese Breakfast, the Sable soundtrack is mostly ambient music. Zauner took inspiration from other game soundtracks, notably the soundtracks to the Final Fantasy games, Secret of Mana (1993), Chrono Cross (1999) and two games in The Legend of Zelda series: Majora's Mask (2000) and Breath of the Wild (2017). Her commission was announced during E3 2018. The game was to be released in 2019, but was delayed twice.[32] In 2020, during the COVID-19 lockdown, Zauner began reworking the songs after playing updated versions of the game.[33] The game and its soundtrack were released on September 23, 2021.[34][35]

In 2019, Japanese Breakfast released two singles under the W Hotels music label: "Essentially" and a cover of the Tears for Fears song "Head over Heels." Zauner recorded the singles in Bali, which she described as a "glamorous change" because she had typically recorded in "cold studios."[36] Proceeds from the latter single were donated to the American Civil Liberties Union.[37] That year, Zauner told Flood Magazine that she aimed to make a "fun album" for Japanese Breakfast's third album.[38] This would manifest as Jubilee, her second studio album for the Dead Oceans label.[39]

Zauner in 2021 performing live with her band at the Neptune Theatre in Seattle

The rollout of Jubilee began on March 2, 2021, with the release of the album's lead single, "Be Sweet", and a video for the song.[40][41] Two other singles—"Posing in Bondage"[42] and "Savage Good Boy"[43][44]—were released before the album itself dropped on June 4. Zauner said the album was inspired by joy, in contrast to earlier Japanese Breakfast albums,[45] and that she was inspired to "go big" by Icelandic musician Björk's third album, Homogenic (1997).[9] Jubilee was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album and Japanese Breakfast for the Grammy Award for Best New Artist, but lost at the 64th Annual Grammy Awards to St. Vincent's album Daddy's Home and to Olivia Rodrigo.[46] On August 7, Japanese Breakfast embarked on the Jubilee Tour.[47]

In March 2022, Japanese Breakfast announced that they would open for English indie rock band Florence and the Machine[48] and American indie rock bands the National[49] and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.[50]

In mid-2022, Japanese Breakfast and Chicago-based Goose Island Brewery teamed up to produce a limited-edition lager named "Be Sweet" after the song. The beer was sold at the Pitchfork Music Festival in July 2022; proceeds were donated to Heart of Dinner, a charity that helps elderly Asian-Americans who struggle with food insecurity in New York City.[51]

Musical style

From left to right: Deven Craige, Craig Hendrix, Michelle Zauner, and Peter Bradley

Japanese Breakfast's sound has primarily been described as indie pop[52][53] containing elements of experimental pop,[54][55] lo-fi,[15] dream pop[56] and indie rock.[57] The band's early releases, including Psychopomp, have been described as lo-fi[58][59][60] while later releases, including the band's second and third albums, Soft Sounds from Another Planet and Jubilee have primarily been labeled as indie pop with elements of shoegaze and chamber pop.[19][39][61] Sable has been described as ambient music.[62][63]

The band has re-recorded and re-released songs to give them wider audiences. Psychopomp includes songs from American Sound and Where Is My Great Big Feeling.[64] Soft Sounds includes "Boyish", originally released as "Day 6" on June. Jubilee includes "In Hell", originally a bonus track on the Japanese deluxe edition of Soft Sounds.[45][65]

Band members

  • Michelle Zauner – lead vocals, guitar (2013–present)
  • Craig Hendrix – drums, percussion, keyboards, backing vocals (2017–present), bass (2016–2017), guitar (2017)
  • Devin Craige – bass guitar (2017–present)
  • Peter Bradley – guitar (2017–present)

Former members

  • Leslie Bear – bass, backing vocals (2017)
  • Kat Casale – drums, percussion (2016–2017)

Discography

Studio albums

TitleAlbum detailsPeak chart positions
US
[66]
US
Alt

[67]
US
Indie

[68]
US
Rock

[69]
GER
[70]
NZ
[71]
SCO
[72]
UK
[73]
UK
Indie

[74]
Psychopomp
Soft Sounds from Another Planet
  • Released: July 14, 2017[76]
  • Label: Dead Oceans
  • Format: LP, CD, cassette, digital download, streaming
[A]18[B]46
Jubilee
  • Released: June 4, 2021[79]
  • Label: Dead Oceans
  • Format: LP, CD, cassette, digital download, streaming
567787711533
"—" denotes album that did not chart or was not released

Soundtrack albums

TitleAlbum detailsPeak chart positions
US
Sales

[80]
UK
OST

[81]
Sable (Original Video Game Soundtrack)
  • Released: September 24, 2021
  • Label: Sony Masterworks
  • Formats: LP, CD, digital download, streaming
487

Compilation albums

TitleAlbum details
June
  • Released: June 1, 2013
  • Label: Ranch
  • Formats: Cassette, digital download

EPs

TitleEP details
American Sound
  • Released: June 6, 2014[82]
  • Label: Seagreen
  • Formats: Cassette, digital download
Where Is My Great Big Feeling?
  • Released: June 6, 2014[82]
  • Label: Seagreen
  • Formats: Cassette, digital download
Japanese Breakfast on Audiotree Live
Spotify Singles
  • Released: April 28, 2018[84]
  • Label: Dead Oceans
  • Formats: 7-inch, digital download, streaming
Polyvinyl 4-Track Singles Series, Vol. 3
  • Released: September 28, 2018[85]
  • Label: Dead Oceans
  • Formats: 7-inch, digital download, streaming
W Records x Japanese Breakfast
  • Released: July 5, 2019
  • Label: W
  • Formats: 7-inch, digital download, streaming
Live at Electric Lady
  • Released: October 18, 2021
  • Label: Dead Oceans
  • Formats: Streaming
Spotify Singles
  • Released: March 30, 2022[86]
  • Label: Dead Oceans
  • Formats: Streaming

Singles

TitleYearChart positionsAlbum
US
AAA

[87]
US
Alt.

[88]
US
Rock
Air.

[89]
BEL
(FL)

[90]
ICE
[91]
"In Heaven"[92]2016Psychopomp
"The Woman That Loves You"[93]
"Everybody Wants to Love You"[94]
"Machinist"[95]2017Soft Sounds from Another Planet
"Boyish"[96]
"Road Head"[97]
"Essentially"[98]2019W Records X Japanese Breakfast
"Head over Heels"[99]
"Be Sweet"[100]202173438[C]4Jubilee
"Posing in Bondage"[101]
"Savage Good Boy"
"Paprika"[102]
"Slide Tackle"16
"Glider"Sable
"Nobody Sees Me Like You Do"[103]2022Ocean Child: Songs of Yoko Ono
"—" denotes a recording that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

As featured artist

TitleYearAlbum
"Maybes"[104]
(Giraffage featuring Japanese Breakfast)
2017Too Real

Music videos

TitleYearDirector(s)Ref.
"In Heaven"2016Adam Kolodny[105]
"Jane Cum"[106]
"Everybody Wants To Love You"Adam Kolodny and Michelle Zauner[107]
"Machinist"2017Michelle Zauner[108]
"Road Head"[109]
"The Body Is a Blade"[110]
"Boyish"2018[111]
"Be Sweet"2021[112]
"Posing in Bondage"[113]
"Savage Good Boy"[114]

Notes

  1. ^ Soft Sounds from Another Planet did not enter the US Billboard 200 but did peak at number 9 on the Heatseekers Albums chart.[77]
  2. ^ Soft Sounds from Another Planet did not enter the NZ Top 40 Albums Chart, but peaked at number nine on the NZ Heatseeker Albums Chart.[78]
  3. ^ "Be Sweet" did not enter the Ultratop Top 50, but spent 4 weeks as an extra tip on the Ultratop Bubbling Under chart.[90]

Tour

Headlining

  • Psychopomp Tour (2016–2017)
  • Soft Sounds from Another Planet Tour (2017–2019)
  • Jubilee Tour (2021–2022)

Awards and nominations

YearAssociationCategoryNominated WorkResultRef
2022Grammy AwardsBest New ArtistJapanese BreakfastNominated[3]
Best Alternative Music AlbumJubileeNominated
GLAAD Media AwardOutstanding Breakthrough Music ArtistNominated[115]
Libera AwardsRecord of the YearWon[116]
Best Alternative Rock RecordWon
Breakthrough Artist/ReleaseNominated
Creative PackagingWon
Marketing GeniusWon
Video of the Year"Savage Good Boy"Nominated
Best Live/Livestream Act"Be Sweet" at The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy FallonNominated

References

  1. ^ "Fine Ingredients with Kogonada & Michelle Zauner". a24films.com. March 30, 2022. Archived from the original on June 30, 2022. Retrieved July 15, 2022.
  2. ^ "Japanese Breakfast on Grief, Imposter Syndrome, and Korean Representation". Teen Vogue. July 14, 2017. Archived from the original on July 9, 2022. Retrieved July 9, 2022.
  3. ^ a b "2022 GRAMMYs Awards Show: Complete Nominations List". Grammys.com. November 23, 2021. Archived from the original on November 25, 2021. Retrieved November 23, 2021.
  4. ^ "Japanese Breakfast Billboard 200". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 11, 2022. Retrieved July 28, 2022.
  5. ^ "June - Japanese Breakfast". Bandcamp. July 1, 2013. Archived from the original on November 30, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  6. ^ "Where Is My Great Big Feeling? - Japanese Breakfast". Bandcamp. June 6, 2014. Archived from the original on February 5, 2022. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  7. ^ "American Sound - Japanese Breakfast". Bandcamp. July 24, 2014. Archived from the original on October 5, 2021. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  8. ^ Hannah, Andy (October 18, 2016). "In the Rugged Country: Michelle Zauner of Japanese Breakfast tells Andy Hannah about the loss which brought her back to the Pacific Northwest". The Line of Best Fit. Archived from the original on December 25, 2016. Retrieved December 24, 2016.
  9. ^ a b "Japanese Breakfast Is Working the Pain Away". Pitchfork. March 8, 2021. Archived from the original on January 26, 2022. Retrieved May 27, 2022.
  10. ^ Gardin, Russell (June 28, 2016). "Pop Music Has A Sense of Urgency: An Interview With Japanese Breakfast". FreePressHouston.com. Archived from the original on December 25, 2016. Retrieved December 25, 2016.
  11. ^ "Japanese Breakfast - Albums, Songs, and News". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on March 28, 2022. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  12. ^ "Japanese Breakfast – "In Heaven" (Stereogum Premiere)". Stereogum. January 20, 2016. Archived from the original on March 14, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2022.
  13. ^ Cohen, Ian (January 25, 2016). "Japanese Breakfast: "In Heaven"". Pitchfork. Condé Nast. Archived from the original on July 8, 2022. Retrieved July 8, 2022.
  14. ^ Moreland, Quinn. "Japanese Breakfast: "Everybody Wants to Love You"". Pitchfork. Condé Nast. Archived from the original on March 22, 2023. Retrieved July 9, 2022.
  15. ^ a b Gaca, Anna (June 23, 2016). "Japanese Breakfast Shares 'Jane Cum' Video, Signs to Dead Oceans". Spin. Eldridge Industries. Archived from the original on May 18, 2017. Retrieved May 31, 2017.
  16. ^ "Watch Japanese Breakfast Shotgun Beer in New "Everybody Wants to Love You" Video". Pitchfork. September 21, 2016. Archived from the original on July 9, 2022. Retrieved July 9, 2022.
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External links

Same album, but different version(s)...