Molly Tuttle & Golden Highway ¦ Crooked Tree

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Format

Inhalt

Label

Release

Veröffentlichung Crooked Tree:

2022

Hörbeispiel(e) Crooked Tree:

Crooked Tree auf Wikipedia (oder andere Quellen):

Artist(s)

Veröffentlichungen von Molly Tuttle die im OTRS erhältlich sind/waren:

Crooked Tree ¦ ...But I'd Rather Be With You

Molly Tuttle auf Wikipedia (oder andere Quellen):

Molly Rose Tuttle (born January 14, 1993)[1] is an American vocalist, songwriter, banjo player, guitarist, recording artist, and teacher in the bluegrass tradition. She is noted for her flatpicking, clawhammer,[2] and crosspicking[3] guitar prowess. She has cited Laurie Lewis, Kathy Kallick, Alison Krauss and Hazel Dickens as role models.[4] In 2017, Tuttle was the first woman to win the International Bluegrass Music Association's Guitar Player of the Year award.[5] In 2018 she won the award again, along with being named the Americana Music Association's Instrumentalist of the Year. In 2023, Tuttle won the Best Bluegrass Album for Crooked Tree and also received a nomination for the all-genre Best New Artist award at the 65th Annual Grammy Awards.[6] Also in 2023, Tuttle and Golden Highway won International Bluegrass Music Awards for album Crooked Tree and the title track in the categories of Album of the Year and Song of the Year, respectively, while Tuttle won Female Vocalist of the Year.[7]

Biography

Early career

Born in Santa Clara, California and raised in Palo Alto, Tuttle began playing guitar at age 8.[8][9][10] At age 11, she played onstage with her father Jack Tuttle, a bluegrass multi-instrumentalist and instructor.[10] At age 15, she joined her family band The Tuttles with AJ Lee. Her siblings Sullivan (guitar) and Michael (mandolin), and mandolist AJ Lee[11] are also in the band.[12]

In 2006, at age 13, Tuttle recorded The Old Apple Tree with her dad, an album of duets.[13] Tuttle graduated from Palo Alto High School in 2011.[14][15]

In 2011, the Tuttles self-released their Introducing the Tuttles album,[16] and the Endless Ocean album in 2013.[17]

In 2012, Tuttle was awarded merit scholarships to the Berklee College of Music for music and composition,[18] received the Foundation for Bluegrass Music's first Hazel Dickens Memorial Scholarship,[19] won the Chris Austin Songwriting Competition at the Merlefest Music Festival,[20] and appeared with her dad on A Prairie Home Companion.[21]

Collaborations

While studying at the Berklee College of Music, in 2014, Tuttle met and joined the all-female bluegrass group the Goodbye Girls.[20] They combine bluegrass, jazz, and Swedish folk music.[22] Other members are Allison de Groot (banjo), Lena Jonsson (fiddle), and Brittany Karlson (bass). They released an EP Going to Boston in 2014, and the album Snowy Side of the Mountain in 2016.[23] The band has also toured Jonsson's home country Sweden several times.[24]

Tuttle also recorded Molly Tuttle & John Mailander, a duet EP with fiddler John Mailander.[25]

In 2018, she joined Alison Brown, Missy Raines, Sierra Hull, and Becky Buller in a supergroup. The quintet performed at the Rockygrass festival in Lyons Colorado on July 27, 2018. Initially known as the Julia Belles, the group later became known as the First Ladies of Bluegrass. Additional gigs were booked at Analog at the Hutton Hotel in Nashville on September 18, 2018 and the IBMA Wide Open Bluegrass Festival on September 28, 2018. She also collaborated with Billy Strings on the songs "Sittin' on Top of the World" and "Billy in the Lowground."

The First Ladies of Bluegrass are featured on the first single from a full-length CD by Missy Raines titled Royal Traveler released in 2018 on Compass Records.[26]

Solo career

Molly Tuttle & Golden Highway on tour at the Blue Ridge Music Center in Galax, Virginia on September 3, 2022

In 2015, Tuttle moved from Boston to Nashville.[27] Her EP Rise was released in 2017 after a crowdfunding campaign. She wrote all of the songs on the 7-song album, which was produced by Kai Welch.[28] Guests included Darrell Scott, the Milk Carton Kids, Kathy Kallick, and Nathaniel Smith.[29] She formed The Molly Tuttle Band, which included Wes Corbett (banjo), Joe K. Walsh (mandolin), and Hasee Ciaccio (bass).[20] Tuttle was selected by Buddy Miller to join his "Cavalcade of Stars" section of Hardly Strictly Bluegrass on the Rooster Stage on October 6, 2018.

In 2017, Tuttle signed with Alison Brown's Compass Records.[30][31] Tuttle released her debut album When You're Ready via Compass Records on April 5, 2019.[32] Next she released ... but I'd rather be with you again on Compass Records in August 2020.[33]

In 2021, Tuttle assembled with her new "dream" band, Golden Highway, including Shelby Means on bass, Kyle Tuttle on banjo, Bronwyn Keith-Hynes on fiddle, and Dominick Leslie on mandolin, with everyone sharing or supporting vocals. Late in 2021 they began playing gigs and began touring in earnest at the start of 2022.[citation needed] In January 2022, Nonesuch Records announced a release by Molly Tuttle & Golden Highway titled Crooked Tree on April 1, 2022.[34] Their follow-up album, City of Gold, was released in July 2023.[35]

Personal life

Tuttle was diagnosed with alopecia areata when she was three years old, which quickly progressed to alopecia universalis, resulting in total body hair loss.[36]

Discography

Solo albums

TitleAlbum detailsPeak chart positionsSales
US
Heat

[37]
US
Indie

[38]
US
Bluegrass

[39]
Rise (EP)18472
When You're Ready
  • Released: April 5, 2019
  • Label: Compass
  • Formats: CD, vinyl, digital download, streaming
511
But I'd Rather Be with You
  • Released: August 28, 2020
  • Label: Compass
  • Formats: CD, vinyl, digital download, streaming
Crooked Tree[41]
  • Released: April 1, 2022
  • Label: Nonesuch
  • Formats: CD, vinyl, digital download, streaming
121
City of Gold
  • Released: July 21, 2023
  • Label: Nonesuch
  • Formats: CD, vinyl, digital download, streaming
221
"—" denotes releases that did not chart

The Goodbye Girls

  • 2014: Going to Boston (self-released)
  • 2016: Snowy Side of the Mountain (self-released)

Molly Tuttle and John Mailander

  • 2014: Molly Tuttle and John Mailander EP (Back Studio)

The Tuttles With AJ Lee

  • 2012: Introducing the Tuttles With AJ Lee (self-released)
  • 2013: Endless Ocean (self-released)

Molly and Jack Tuttle

  • 2007: The Old Apple Tree (Back Studio)

As a featured artist

Awards and nominations

YearAssociationCategoryNominated WorkResultRef
2016International Bluegrass Music AwardsMomentum AwardHerselfWon
2017Guitar Player of the YearWon[42][5]
2018International Folk Music AwardsSong of the Year"You Didn't Call My Name"Won
Americana Music Honors & AwardsInstrumentalist of the YearHerselfWon[43]
International Bluegrass Music AwardsEmerging Artist of the YearNominated[44]
Guitar Player of the YearWon
Female Vocalist of the YearNominated
Album of the YearRiseNominated
Song of the Year"You Didn't Call My Name"Nominated
Recorded Event of the Year"Swept Away"[A]Won
2019International Bluegrass Music AwardsFemale Vocalist of the YearHerselfNominated[45]
Guitar Player of the YearNominated
Song of the Year"Take the Journey"[B]Nominated
Collaborative Recording Of The Year"Soldiers Joy/Ragtime Annie"[C]Nominated
2020International Bluegrass Music AwardsFemale Vocalist of the YearHerselfNominated[46]
Guitar Player of the YearNominated
2021International Bluegrass Music AwardsFemale Vocalist of the YearHerselfNominated[47]
Guitar Player of the YearNominated
2022International Bluegrass Music AwardsEntertainer of the YearMolly Tuttle & Golden HighwayNominated[48][49]
Instrumental Group of the YearNominated
Female Vocalist of the YearHerselfWon
Guitar Player of the YearNominated
Album of the YearCrooked TreeNominated
2023Grammy AwardsBest New ArtistHerselfNominated[6]
Best Bluegrass AlbumCrooked TreeWon
International Folk Music AwardsAlbum of the YearWon[50]
International Bluegrass Music AwardsEntertainer of the YearMolly Tuttle & Golden HighwayNominated[51]
Instrumental Group of the YearNominated
Song of the Year"Crooked Tree"Won
Album of the YearCrooked TreeWon
Collaborative Recording of the Year"From My Mountain (Calling You)"[D]Nominated
Female Vocalist of the YearHerselfWon
Guitar Player of the YearNominated
2024Grammy AwardsBest Bluegrass AlbumCity of GoldWon[52]

^ A. with Missy Raines, Alison Brown, Becky Buller and Sierra Hull
^ B. Molly Tuttle (artist), Molly Tuttle/Sarah Siskind (writer)
^ C. with Roland White, Justin Hiltner, Jon Weisberger and Patrick McAvinue
^ D. with Peter Rowan and Lindsay Lou

References

  1. ^ Rose, Mike (January 14, 2023). "Today's famous birthdays list for January 14, 2023 includes celebrities Dave Grohl, Carl Weathers". Cleveland.com. Retrieved January 14, 2023.
  2. ^ Jason Verlinde (September 1, 2016). "Molly Tuttle – "Old Man at the Mill"". Fretboard Journal. Archived from the original on October 9, 2017. Retrieved September 30, 2017.
  3. ^ Jeffrey Pepper Rodgers (February 16, 2017). "Crosspicking 101: A Private Bluegrass Lesson with Molly Tuttle". Acoustic Guitar. Archived from the original on September 29, 2017. Retrieved September 30, 2017.
  4. ^ Jewly Hight (August 29, 2017). "World Cafe Nashville: Molly Tuttle". World Cafe. Archived from the original on October 4, 2017. Retrieved September 30, 2017.
  5. ^ a b Juli Thanki (September 29, 2017). "Molly Tuttle makes bluegrass history at IMBA Awards in Raleigh". Tennessean. Retrieved September 30, 2017.
  6. ^ a b Nicholson, Jessica (November 15, 2022). "Molly Tuttle Talks Best New Artist, Best Bluegrass Album Grammy Nominations: 'I Was Shocked'". Billboard.
  7. ^ Lawless, John (September 23, 2024). "2023 IBMA Bluegrass Music Awards winners". Bluegrass Country. Retrieved February 8, 2024.
  8. ^ Kat Harding (September 27, 2017). "Molly Tuttle Is IBMA's First Female Nominee for Guitarist of the Year—And She's Not Stopping There". Indy Week. Archived from the original on July 28, 2018. Retrieved September 30, 2017.
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  14. ^ "Paly student preserves tradition of bluegrass". The Paly Voice. December 10, 2007. Retrieved May 1, 2022. Molly Tuttle, a 14-year-old freshman at Paly, has been preserving the underappreciated tradition of performing bluegrass music for six years.
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  31. ^ John Curtis Goad (September 26, 2017). "Molly Tuttle to Compass Records". Bluegrass Today. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved September 30, 2017.
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  36. ^ "Alopecia Areata". Molly Tuttle.
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  38. ^ "Molly Tuttle Chart History > Independent Albums". Billboard. Archived from the original on August 1, 2019.
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  40. ^ Bjorke, Matt (September 4, 2019). "Top 10 Country Album Sales Chart: September 4, 2019". Roughstock. Retrieved September 13, 2019.
  41. ^ Freeman, Jon (January 20, 2022). "Molly Tuttle Recruits Margo Price, Billy Strings for New Album 'Crooked Tree'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved March 5, 2022.
  42. ^ Stephen L. Betts (September 29, 2017). "2017 Bluegrass Awards: Earls of Leicester Named Entertainer of the Year". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on September 30, 2017. Retrieved September 30, 2017.
  43. ^ "The 2018 Americana Music Award Winners". KOKE FM. Archived from the original on September 19, 2018. Retrieved September 19, 2018.
  44. ^ Betts, Stephen L. (July 25, 2018). "Molly Tuttle, Becky Buller Lead 2018 Bluegrass Award Nominations". rollingstone.com. Archived from the original on July 28, 2018. Retrieved May 6, 2019.
  45. ^ John Lawless (July 24, 2019). "2019 IBMA Award nominees announced". bluegrasstoday.com.
  46. ^ Casey Campbell (July 26, 2020). "Nominations for the 31st Annual IBMA Bluegrass Music Awards Announced". ibma.org.
  47. ^ Casey Campbell (July 20, 2021). "Nominations for the 31nd Annual IBMA Bluegrass Music Awards Presented by Yamaha Announced". ibma.org.
  48. ^ John Lawless (July 26, 2022). "2022 IBMA Bluegrass Music Awards nominees announced". bluegrasstoday.com.
  49. ^ John Lawless (September 29, 2022). "2022 IBMA Bluegrass Award winners". bluegrasstoday.com.
  50. ^ Paul Grein (February 1, 2023). "Janis Ian, Molly Tuttle & Golden Highway Win Top Awards at 2023 International Folk Music Awards: Full List". Billboard.
  51. ^ "SEE THE FULL LIST OF 2023 IBMA AWARDS NOMINEES AND BLUEGRASS MUSIC HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES". July 19, 2022.
  52. ^ "2024 Bluegrass Grammy winner". bluegrasstoday.com. Retrieved February 4, 2024.

External links